Welcome the Future of Friendship project!

Welcome the Future of Friendship project! This project was conceived of and is facilitated by Canadian educator Bill Belsey.

This project will explore the topic of friendship by asking the critical question, “What is the future of friendship?”

Please click here to take our online survey

#NoTechatTheTable

Parents: Please consider having a rule. Make time each day to talk & especially LISTEN to your kids! 

NoTechatTheTable

 

Can We Auto-Correct Humanity? by @PrinceEa

Look Up -a Spoken Word Poem for the “Always-on” Generation

The Innovation of Loneliness

The Innovation of Loneliness from Shimi Cohen on Vimeo.

Research: The Third Wheel -The Impact of Twitter Use on Relationship Infidelity and Divorce

The Third Wheel -The Impact of Twitter Use on Relationship Infidelity and Divorce (PDF)

The purpose of this study was to examine how social networking site (SNS) use, specifically Twitter use, influences negative interpersonal relationship outcomes. This study specifically examined the mediational effect of Twitter-related conflict on the relationship between active Twitter use and negative relationship outcomes, and how this mechanism may be contingent on the length of the romantic relationship. A total of 581 Twitter users aged 18 to 67 years (Mage=29, SDage=8.9) completed an online survey questionnaire. Moderation–mediation regression analyses using bootstrapping methods indicated that Twitter-related conflict mediated the relationship between active Twitter use and negative relationship outcomes. The length of the romantic relationship, however, did not moderate the indirect effect on the relationship between active Twitter use and negative relationship outcomes. The results from this study suggest that active Twitter use leads to greater amounts of Twitter-related conflict among romantic partners, which in turn leads to infidelity, breakup, and divorce. This indirect effect is not contingent on the length of the romantic relationship. The current study adds to the growing body of literature investigating SNS use and romantic relationship outcomes.

Bride Checks Phone During Wedding Ceremony

Unfriended by Garrison Keillor / Prairie Home Companion

I’ve been unwanted before it’s true
And uninvited a time or two
Today I’m feeling unusually blue
I’ve been unfriended by you

The hourly updates on your activities
Your joys, your pain, your sensitivities
All of the parties you have attended
No, I’ve been unfriended

I had twenty-nine friends, an old high school buddy,
A couple of guys from Adult Bible Study,
Neighbors, and cousins, a high school classmate,
And then one morning I had sixty-eight.

The list of your friends: 3000 and growing
Three thousand folks who think you’re worth knowing
You’re a popular person, you don’t need me
You’ve got Carla and Nicholas Sarkozy

Unfriended, where can I go?
Back to the people I used to know.
The women at church, the guys at the bar,
They could try to unfriend me but I know where they are.

I offered you friendship when I saw you online
I thought you’d become a true friend of mine
You posted a comment, I thought we were close
But now I am toast.

I feel like I’m back in my high school cafeteria
And I get the cold shoulder and I’m sent to Siberia
And no one will talk to me, nobody, none,
I once was befriended but now I am Un.

How could you do it, just delete my name?
I’m not a left-winger, nor an old flame,
I’m not a stalker and you’re not a star,
But now I’ll expose you for the jerk that you are.

You know it’s inevitable that we will meet
In real time on an actual street
I’ll be so cool — OMG — how sweet.
And I’ll look away as I press delete.

Unfriended
Unfriended, boogers on you
You and all the friends you knew
Have just been unfriended too

Social Media Blamed For 50% Of Breakups

Social media contributes to the demise of most romantic relationships nowadays, according to a survey of 1,953 Brits, who had all ended a serious relationship or marriage in the last two years — meaning they were the “dumper,” not the “dumpee.” That number includes various types of married and unmarried relationships, as 24% of the respondents had been married, 41% had been living together, and 35% had been living separately before parting ways.

Social media was certainly “in the mix” for a good number of the breakups: 79% of respondents said they were using social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram during their relationships, and 36% had met their ex online, including dating sides. Now the key figures: 54% said they felt that social media played a role in the breakup, with 34% saying their ex met someone new on social media, and 17% complaining their ex ignored them in favor of social media.

Social media also played a role in breakups by giving people a false sense of confidence, with 23% of respondents saying they entered a relationship believing they knew the person better than they did, given their social media profiles. There was also a comparison component: 12% said that seeing other happy couples on social media led them to realize they weren’t happy in their own relationship.

These findings echo some other survey results. In March 2013, a survey of 2,000 men and women in the U.S. and the U.K. by Havas Worldwide found that 50% knew someone whose romantic relationship started online, while 25% knew someone whose offline relationship ended because of their actions online.

Here’s an idea: Since it’s helping start and end the relationship anyway, why not tie everything up in a neat little package by breaking up over social media? In May 2013, a survey of 4,000 women around the world by AVG Technologies found that 19% of women ages 18-25 said they have ended a relationship by posting on Facebook, while 38% of women in the same age-range said they have broken up via text message.

Source:
http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/218921/social-media-blamed-for-50-of-breakups.html?edition=69669

Texting: Can we pull the plug on our obsession? -CBS Sunday Morning

‘Unfriending’ someone on Facebook has real-life consequences: study

Forty percent of people in a recent study said they would steer clear of someone who unfriended them on the popular social networking site. The top reason for unfriending? ‘Frequent, unimportant posts.’

“Unfriend” someone on Facebook whose posts you find annoying? A new study finds that that person may avoid you, forever.

Study author Christopher Sibona, a computer science doctoral student at the University of Colorado in Denver, says that while a lot of people use social networks as a source of entertainment, your Facebook actions “can have real world consequences.”

RELATED: USERS ‘UNFRIENDING’ FACEBOOK IN DROVES

He found that 40 percent of people surveyed said they would steer clear of anyone in real life who had unfriended them on Facebook. Another 10 percent were unsure. Women said they would avoid contact more than men.

The study, published this month by the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, was based on 582 survey responses gathered via Twitter.

Sibona outlines the top four reasons people are unfriended on Facebook:

1. Frequent, unimportant posts
2. Polarizing posts usually about politics or religion
3. Inappropriate posts involving sexist, racist remarks
4. Being boring: drab posts about kids, food, etc.

However, being unfriended can trigger feelings of ostracism, which can have “important psychological consequences for those to whom it occurs.”

Ref: http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/unfriending-real-life-consequences-study-article-1.1256722#ixzz2KEVekHcd